Yesterday Morning - Granta Magazine

Yesterday Morning

Diana Athill

A remarkable, truthful and vivid recollection of childhood, from the author of Stet, After a Funeral, Don’t Look at Me Like That and Instead of a Letter. Here Athill goes back to the beginning in a sharp evocation of a childhood unfashionably filled with happiness – a Norfolk country house, servants, the pleasures of horses, the unfolding secrets of adults and sex. This is England in the 1920s seen (with a clear and unsentimental eye) from the vantage point of England in 2001. It was a privileged and loving life: but did it equip the author to be happy?

  • Published: 06/10/2011
  • Paperback
  • ISBN: 9781847084262
  • 129x20mm, 176 pages

A joy to read from start to finish

Sunday Independent

Athill's astringent prose has the remarkable quality of making one look forward to old age

Evening Standard

Yesterday Morning is a captivating book. It is as if she had set out with a butterfly net to catch everything about her early life in an upper-middle-class English family before it - or she - vanished: the beloved grand house in Norfolk, the servants, her unhappily married parents.

Kate Kellaway, Guardian

The Author

Diana Athill was born in 1917. She helped André Deutsch establish the publishing company that bore his name and worked as an editor for Deutsch for four decades. Athill’s distinguished career as an editor is the subject of her acclaimed memoir Stet. She is the author of seven further volumes of memoirs, Instead of a Letter, After a Funeral, Yesterday Morning, Make Believe, Somewhere Towards the End, Alive, Alive Oh!, A Florence Diary, and a collection of letters, Instead of a Book, all published by Granta. Her only novel, Don’t Look At Me Like That, was first published in 1967. In January 2009, she won the Costa Biography Award for Somewhere Towards the End, and was presented with an OBE. She died in January 2019.

More about the author →

Diana Athill on Granta.com

Essays & Memoir | The Online Edition

Lessons

Diana Athill

‘My two valuable lessons are: avoid romanticism and abhor possessiveness.’

Essays & Memoir | The Online Edition

Alive, Alive-Oh!

Diana Athill

‘She thought of herself as a rational woman, but while she could sleep alone in an empty house for night after night without worrying, there were other nights when her nerves twitched like a rabbit's at the least sound.’

Essays & Memoir | The Online Edition

Somewhere Towards the End

Diana Athill

‘We knew that we would give each other no trouble.’